Faculty Awards, Honors & Publications

Recent Honors, Awards, Appointments and Publications (Listed by date)

Dr. Sherene Shalhub

Dr. Sherene Shalhub

(June 2021) Dr. Sherene Shalhub, Associate Professor Division of Vascular Surgery, received the “Pioneer in EDS and HSD Research Award” for her demonstrating a long-term commitment to outstanding research and progression into Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, hypermobility spectrum disorders, and the associated symptoms and conditions. “I am truly humbled,” said Dr. Shalhub. “I feel a deep sense of gratitude every day for all the help and support from everyone to make this possible.”

(September 2020) The Aortic Dissection Collaborative, led by Dr. Shalhub, received a funding award through the Patient– Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Eugene Washing ton Engagement Awards program to convene a collaborative of patients with–and at risk for–aortic dissection.

The team aims to improve the management of aortic dissection and increase quality of life for people impacted by this condition. To do so, the collaborative is engaging stakeholders to build a research infrastructure focused on patient–centered outcomes. It will feature research training; support and net working among patients, physicians and researchers with expertise in aortic dissection; research consortia dedicated to aortic dissection; industry stakeholders; and patient advocacy groups.

The main deliverable over the next t wo years is to create a virtual research network and establish research priorities among the stakeholder group, Shalhub explained. These research priorities will then be used to guide future research proposals that reflect patient centered priorities.

Dr. Shalhub was recognized as a “ Vascular Hero” through Vascular Cures’ #vascularhero social media campaign. Each year, Vascular Cures honors, celebrates and appreciates heroes who are on the front line battling the devastating effects of vascular disease such as strokes, pulmonary embolisms, aortic aneurysms, vascular dementia and peripheral artery disease. Vascular Cures requested nominations by posting the nominee’s photo or a story on social media ( Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram) with the hashtag #vascularhero and the tag @vascularcures.

Dr. Shalhub remarked, “I am deeply honored to be named a vascular hero: None of this work is possible alone and I am grateful for our partners in the VEDS and Aortic Dissection Collaboratives. Engaging patients as partners in the research process has been one of the most fulfilling experiences as a surgeon and researcher.”

Dr. Kathleen Berfield

Dr. Kathleen Berfield

Dr. Kathleen Berfield, Assistant Professor, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Chief of Thoracic Surgery VA Puget Sound Health Care System, has been named the Chair of the inaugural National Surgery Office Thoracic Surgical Advisory Board (SAB).  As Chair of the Thoracic SAB, she will lead other Thoracic surgeons within the Veterans Health Administration and serve as subject matter experts to the National Surgery Office and Veterans Health Administration leadership.  Dr. Berfield, previously served on the Cardiothoracic Surgery SAB and started her 3- year term as Chair for Thoracic Surgery on June 1st.

Dr. Peter Wu

Dr. Peter Wu

(May 2021) Dr. Peter Wu, Associate Professor, VA Puget Sound Health Care System (VA), received the American College of Surgeon’s Commission on Cancer’s (CoC) State Chair Outstanding Performance Award for exhibiting outstanding leadership, innovation and making significant contributions to cancer care improvement in Washington state. The award will be presented to Dr. Wu at the CoC’s virtual State Chair Town Hall meeting in October 2021.

Dr. Wu also received a $20,000 American Cancer Society award to support his “Return to Screening Quality of Improvement Project” to address the impact of Covid-19 on colorectal cancer screening at the VA.

Dr. Barclay Stewart

Dr. Barclay Stewart

(April 2021) Drs. Kajal Mehta, Nikki Thrikutam and Barclay Stewart, HIPRC core member, along with partners from Ghana, Nepal, International Society for Burn Injuries (ISBI) and World Health Organization (WHO) were awarded the American Burn Association Peter Brigham Burn Epidemiology Award for their work on cookstove-related injuries. Cookstove-related burns are among the most common causes of burn injuries globally, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. There is a worldwide push to disseminate more efficient, improved cookstoves and liquid propane gas (LPG) stoves that reduce indoor air pollution, promote gender equality and reduce deforestation. However, improved and LPG cookstoves do not seem to be safer than rudimentary cooking arrangements (e.g., 3-stone fires) and use of biomass fuels.

Their study utilized the newly developed WHO Global Burn Registry (GBR) to describe the distribution cookstove-related hazards, injuries and outcomes of patients from 17 countries. They found that women were more frequently exposed to cookstove hazards, and that cookstove-related injuries were larger in size and more often deadly than non-cookstove-related burn injuries. Additionally, cookstove-related burn injuries were strongly associated with explosions and fires (i.e., not scald or contact injuries), which is thought to be the result of unsafe LPG cookstove maintenance and arrangements. The findings suggest that interventions to prevent cookstove-related burn injuries will require efforts distinct to those typically deployed for household burn injuries more broadly, which will necessarily involve improving cookstove design, promoting safer adaptations of existing cookstoves, and drafting LPG national policy guidelines to prevent fires and explosions from unsafe canisters, regulators and tubing. As their next step, the team is working with Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital Burns Unit, and Ghana Fire Service to perform a community-based, case-control study with home fire investigations to identify hazards and protective factors that can be used to inform engineering, health promotion and policy initiatives.

Alexandra de Leon, BA
Public Information Specialist
Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine

Dr. Barclay Stewart

Dr. Barclay Stewart

(January 2021) The findings of this new study may have important implications for the military, early burn care, and resuscitation of people burned in the rural U.S. and in low- and middle-income countries, where 90% of all burn injuries occur.

Patients with major burns require fluid to prevent dehydration, organ failure and death. Fluid for burns is typically given directly into the blood (i.e., intravenous or IV). However, Warfighters on the battlefield and others injured in remote and/or austere places frequently do not receive appropriate amounts of fluid immediately after injury because IV fluid resuscitation is complicated and requires advanced resources. A simpler, more operationally advantageous strategy for burn resuscitation is urgently needed to improve the outcomes of people burned in austere places like battlefields, ships, rural U.S., low- and middle-income countries.

Dr. Barclay Stewart (Assistant Professor of Surgery and Core Faculty of HIPRC), Dr. Adam Gyedu (Associate Professor of Surgery at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, KNUST, in Ghana), Dr. Charles Mock (Professor of Surgery and Global Injury Section Lead at HIPRC) and their colleagues were awarded $ 1.5M by the Department of Defense to study enteral resuscitation for major burn injuries – Far Forward, Fluid First (4F) EnteroResus Study.

Giving fluid by mouth or through a feeding tube placed through the nose into the stomach to prevent or treat dehydration is called enteral resuscitation. It is particularly attractive because it can be provided by the patient themselves (by drinking), by a non-medical first responder (by a friend or bystander), or by a medical first responder (by a combat medic).

Dr. Stewart and his colleagues are going to perform a cluster-randomized, hybrid I effectiveness-implementation trial of enterally based- vs IV -resuscitation at 18 first-level hospitals in Ghana. All first-level hospitals will receive training in protocolized resuscitation, early burn care, and transfer criteria. All hospitals will also receive a ‘BurnBag’ with the resources required for enterally based- or IV- resuscitation per randomization. Researchers on this study aim to compare the effectiveness of enteral resuscitation in these resource limited facilities and identify challenges and facilitators to implementing enteral resuscitation, particularly those relevant to the Department of Defense.

The findings from this study may have significant impact and direct military benefit, early burn care, and resuscitation of people burned .

In the military, enteral resuscitation may:

  • reduce delays in pre-hospital resuscitation for injured soldiers on the battlefield
  • change the standard of care for the immediate resuscitation of burn injured soldiers
  • advance guidelines for military burn care

The findings will also have important implications for the early burn care and resuscitation of people burned in the rural U.S. and in low- and middle-income countries, where 90% of all burn injuries occur. The study is designed to obtain valuable information about use of enteral resuscitation for burns in real-world and austere settings. By doing so, the team will be able to accelerate the uptake of enteral resuscitation, create effective implementation strategies, and inform burn care training programs in the military and beyond.

Alexandra de Leon, BA
Public Information Specialist
Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine

Dr. Estell Williams

Dr. Estell Williams

(September 2020) UW Health Sciences and UW Medicine pay tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr. yearly and during this challenging time of the COVID pandemic it is being done with a dynamic and engaging website celebrating his life and the diversity at the UW. As part of this celebration, the committee confers a "Distinguished Service Award for Community Service and Volunteerism.” A plaque bearing the names of the recipients is on display in the lobby of the UW Health Sciences Center. The inscription on this plaque is a quote by Dr. King that reads: "Make a career of humanity. Commit yourself to the noble struggle for equal rights. You will make a greater person of yourself, a greater nation of your country, and a finer world to live in. This year the event committee has unanimously chosen Estell J. Williams, MD to receive the 2021 Distinguished Service Award. The values highlighted this year is a reflection, Where do we go from here: Embracing Truth, Demanding Justice, Supporting Community, Valuing Service, Looking Ahead.

MLK Day 2021: Where do we go from here?

Carlos Pellegrini

Dr. Carlos Pellegrini

(September 2020) Dr. Carlos Pellegrini, Department of Surgery Chair 1993–2015, was chosen by the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons’ (SAGE) Awards Committee and confirmed by the Board of Governors as the recipient of the 2021 SAGES George Berci Lifetime Achievement Award which is the highest honor SAGES bestows.

This award is given to a surgeon for a lifetime contribution as an innovator in the field of endoscopic surgery which may be scientific, educational, research, clinical and/or technological.

The award will be presented to Dr. Pellegrini at the SAGES annual meeting in June 2021.

Dr. Kristine Calhoun

Dr. Kristine Calhoun

(September 2020) Dr. Kristine Calhoun, Associate Professor, Division of General Surgery, received the 2020 UW School of Medicine Award for Excellence in Mentoring Women Faculty.

“I was absolutely shocked that I was not only nominated for this award but that I actually was awarded it. There are so many fantastic mentors throughout our department, as well as the School of Medicine in general, that I am humbled to have been singled out,” said Dr. Calhoun. “Mentoring is something that I place high value on—I have been the recipient of excellent mentoring in my own career and make it a priority to give back to those earlier in theirs which makes this award so meaningful. It was humbling to read the letters of support and see my impact on others but so, so gratifying. Awards like this that look at mentoring and teaching are special to me and mean that I am accomplishing the goals I set for myself when I joined an academic practice. I am so, so thankful, grateful and appreciative.”

Dr. Jonathan Sham

Dr. Jonathan Sham

(September 2020) Dr. Jonathan Sham, Assistant Professor, Division of General Surgery, received a $30K grant award from the Americas Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association (AHPBA) to support his work with collaborators in the Department of Bioengineering to develop a novel biopolymer aimed at reducing rates of pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery. Read more about Dr. Sham’s research.

(August 2020) Dr. Sham won Swim Across America's Young Investigator Award for his research with Dr. Buddy Ratner, Professor and Director, Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, to develop a novel bio biopolymer that can be used during pancreatic surgery to reduce the rates of pancreatic fistula. Vimeo video >>

(July 2020) Dr. Sham published “Management of primary hepatic malignancies during the COVID-19 pandemic: recommendations for risk mitigation from a multidisciplinary perspective" in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

The management of hepatobiliary malignancies is complex and resource-intensive. The COVID-19 pandemic imposed unique limitations on healthcare resources and access to care. Dr. Sham worked with an international team of experts to develop guidelines for the management of complex hepatobiliary malignancies during the pandemic in an attempt to aid clinicians around the world in making difficult treatment decisions in real time during the global healthcare crisis.